Episode 103 – The Path of the Righteous Man

What do you get when you cross radical Confucianism with armed samurai? Japan’s first samurai rebellion since the 1630s, and a recipe for one fascinating episode. Cannons, torture, and philosophy: this episode has it all!

Listen to the episode here.

Sources

De Bary, William Theodore et al. “Oshio Heihachiro” in The Sources of the Japanese Tradition, Volume 2, 1600-2000.

Jansen, Marius. The Making of Modern Japan.

Matsuda, Wataru. Japan and China: Mutual Representations in the Modern Era.

Images

Wang Yangming, a Ming Dynasty scholar whose ideas would form the backbone of Oshio's own.
Wang Yangming, a Ming Dynasty scholar whose ideas would form the backbone of Oshio’s own.
Oshio Heihachiro during his time as a yoriki.
Oshio Heihachiro during his time as a yoriki.
Oshio Heihachiro as depicted by Yoshitoshi.
Oshio Heihachiro as depicted by Yoshitoshi.
The Tenpo famine was devastating, killing thousands at a time the shogunate was ill-prepared to respond. The crisis would eventually precipitate Oshio's rebellion.
The Tenpo famine was devastating, killing thousands at a time the shogunate was ill-prepared to respond. The crisis would eventually precipitate Oshio’s rebellion.
A map of Osaka from the Edo period. Courtesy of the historical archives of the city of Osaka.
A map of Osaka from the Edo period. Courtesy of the historical archives of the city of Osaka.
A colorized photo of the grounds surrounding Osaka castle from the 1870s. Though this photo dates from near 40 years later than the rebellion, I think it's interesting for giving us an idea of what the construction in Osaka would have looked like.
A colorized photo of the grounds surrounding Osaka castle from the 1870s. Though this photo dates from near 40 years later than the rebellion, I think it’s interesting for giving us an idea of what the construction in Osaka would have looked like.
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