Episode 73 – The Slow and Steady Step, Part 2

After his defeat at the hands of Hideyoshi, Tokugawa Ieyasu will lie low for a decade or so, biding his time. However, when the opportunity presents itself with Hideyoshi’s death and the succession of his young heir, Ieyasu will strike at last, and gamble everything for one more shot at power.

Listen to the episode here.

Sources

Friday, Karl. Japan Emerging: Premodern History to 1850.

Jansen, Marius. The Making of Modern Japan.

Sadler, AL. Shogun: The Life of Tokugawa Ieyasu.

Sansom, George B. A History of Japan Vol II: 1336-1615.

Images (Courtesy of the Wikimedia Foundation)

The hollyhock crest of the Tokugawa family.
The hollyhock crest of the Tokugawa family.
Hideyoshi and Ieyasu apparently were fond enough of each other to take time to play Go together; they used this board to play. I can't find a record of who won, but I know who I would bet on.
Hideyoshi and Ieyasu apparently were fond enough of each other to take time to play Go together; they used this board to play. I can’t find a record of who won, but I know who I would bet on.
Force deployments at Sekigahara. Ieyasu's troops are in red, the pro-Toyotomi ones led by Ishida Mitsunari in blue. Kobayakawa Hideaki's forces -- the defectors who turned the tide of battle -- are in yellow.
Force deployments at Sekigahara. Ieyasu’s troops are in red, the pro-Toyotomi ones led by Ishida Mitsunari in blue. Kobayakawa Hideaki’s forces — the defectors who turned the tide of battle — are in yellow.
A second view of the Battle of Sekigahara.
A second view of the Battle of Sekigahara.
The Battle of Sekigahara. This screen of the battle was comissioned by the Tokugawa after their seizure of power as a reminder of their great triumph.
The Battle of Sekigahara. This screen of the battle was comissioned by the Tokugawa after their seizure of power as a reminder of their great triumph.
Tokugawa Hidetada, Ieyasu's son and successor as the second Tokugawa shogun.
Tokugawa Hidetada, Ieyasu’s son and successor as the second Tokugawa shogun.
An illustration of the fall of Osaka Castle done by a French Huguenot working for the Dutch East India company called Francois Capon. Capon wrote a book called "A True Description of the Mighty Kingdoms of Japan and Siam," from which this illustration is taken.
An illustration of the fall of Osaka Castle done by a French Huguenot working for the Dutch East India company called Francois Capon. Capon wrote a book called “A True Description of the Mighty Kingdoms of Japan and Siam,” from which this illustration is taken.
The Siege of Osaka Castle .
The Siege of Osaka Castle .
This print is called a Kawariban -- a sort of proto-newspaper. It depicts the fall of Osaka castle to Ieyasu.
This print is called a Kawariban — a sort of proto-newspaper. It depicts the fall of Osaka castle to Ieyasu.
Precepts for success in life written by Ieyasu to guide his descendants in ruling Japan.
Precepts for success in life written by Ieyasu to guide his descendants in ruling Japan.
Ieyasu's inked handprint is preserved at Nikko Shrine and shown here.
Ieyasu’s inked handprint is preserved at Nikko Shrine and shown here.
Nikko Toshogu Shrine, a monument either to Ieyasu's greatness or his ego -- depending on your point of view.
Nikko Toshogu Shrine, a monument either to Ieyasu’s greatness or his ego — depending on your point of view.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s