Episode 70 – The Tokyo Rose

This week, we’re going to talk about the life of Iva Toguri, the woman most associated with the infamous (and legendary) role of the Tokyo Rose. Labelled as a traitor for her actions during the war, Toguri fought hard for her citizenship and her reputation, and was rewarded for her tenacity decades after the fact.

Listen to the episode here.

Sources

The National Archives files on the prosecution of Iva Toguri.

The New York Times obituary for Iva Toguri.

The FBI Profile of Iva Toguri.

Images

Iva Toguri being interviewed by American correspondents in September, 1945.
Iva Toguri being interviewed by American correspondents in September, 1945.
Iva Toguri's mugshot from her time in Sugamo Prison. She was released shortly afterwards, but re-arrested a few years later.
Iva Toguri’s mugshot from her time in Sugamo Prison. She was released shortly afterwards, but re-arrested a few years later.
Iva Toguri outside of Radio Tokyo in 1944.
Iva Toguri outside of Radio Tokyo in 1944.
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Episode 69 – An Unnatural Intimacy, Part 7

In our final episode on the US-Japan relationship, we’ll bring things up to the modern day and discuss the revival of the US-Japan alliance in the 2000s. After decades of tension, today the US-Japan relationship seems closer and more natural than it has ever been. Still, where will things go from here? Only time will tell.

Listen to the episode here.

Sources

Ishihara Shintaro and Morita Akio. 「No」と言える日本

Pyle, Kenneth. Japan Rising.

Pyle, Kenneth. “Japan and the United States: An Unnatural Intimacy.” Journal of Japanese Studies 37, No 2 (Summer 2011), pp. 377-395.

Images

Prime Minister Nakasone Yasuhiro presenting a Japanese-made portable TV to President Ronald Reagan and First Lady Nancy Reagan. Courtesy of aboutcampdavid.blogspot.com.
Prime Minister Nakasone Yasuhiro presenting a Japanese-made portable TV to President Ronald Reagan and First Lady Nancy Reagan. Courtesy of aboutcampdavid.blogspot.com.
Michael Armacost during his time as ambassador to Japan (shown here with PM Takeshita Noboru). Armacost would return to Japan in the early 2000s as part of a push to get Japan to support America's War on Terror.
Michael Armacost during his time as ambassador to Japan (shown here with PM Takeshita Noboru). Armacost would return to Japan in the early 2000s as part of a push to get Japan to support America’s War on Terror.
President Bill Clinton was the first president to take a more assertive stance with the Japanese. He's shown here greeting Emperor Akihito on a state visit to the US. Courtesy of Telegraph.co.uk.
President Bill Clinton was the first president to take a more assertive stance with the Japanese. He’s shown here greeting Emperor Akihito on a state visit to the US. Courtesy of Telegraph.co.uk.
JSDF soldiers deployed in Iraq. Courtesy of USA Tdoay.
JSDF soldiers deployed in Iraq. Courtesy of USA Tdoay.
Koizumi Junichiro is one of Japan's great political legends. He's shown here with Priscilla Presley and Lisa-Marie Presley (Elvis's wife and daughter, respectively) as well as President George W. Bush. Courtesy of People Magazine.
Koizumi Junichiro is one of Japan’s great political legends. He’s shown here with Priscilla Presley and Lisa-Marie Presley (Elvis’s wife and daughter, respectively) as well as President George W. Bush. Courtesy of People Magazine.
An American Soldier in Tohoku as part of Operation Tomodachi, the American relief effort after the 3-11 disaster. Courtesy of the United States Army.
An American Soldier in Tohoku as part of Operation Tomodachi, the American relief effort after the 3-11 disaster. Courtesy of the United States Army.
American Air Force personnel coordinating humanitarian efforts in Tohoku with the JSDF. Courtesy of the United States Pacific Air Forces.
American Air Force personnel coordinating humanitarian efforts in Tohoku with the JSDF. Courtesy of the United States Pacific Air Forces.
Japan Coast Guard vessels intercepting a Chinese civilian ship in the waters around the Senkaku Islands. Activists from China, Taiwan, and Japan have all attempted to go to the islands in order to make their claims to them more visible. Courtesy of the BBC.
Japan Coast Guard vessels intercepting a Chinese civilian ship in the waters around the Senkaku Islands. Activists from China, Taiwan, and Japan have all attempted to go to the islands in order to make their claims to them more visible. Courtesy of the BBC.
The current leaders of Japan and the United States: President Barack Obama and Prime Minister Abe Shinzo.
The current leaders of Japan and the United States: President Barack Obama and Prime Minister Abe Shinzo. Courtesy of the BBC.

Episode 68 – An Unnatural Intimacy, Part 6

This week, we’re jumping ahead to cover the 1950s through the 1980s; Japan and the United States, former foes, are now allies in the Cold War. The relationship, however, is not as smooth as it seems on the surface.

Listen to the episode here.

Sources

Dower, John. Empire and Aftermath.

Dower, John. Embracing Defeat.

Pyle, Kenneth. Japan Rising.

Media

Yoshida Shigeru addressing American journalists upon the signing of the Treaty of San Francisco.

Yoshida Shigeru, the ex-diplomat turned Prime Minister who would lead the group dedicated to putting Okita Saburo's vision into place.
Yoshida Shigeru, the ex-diplomat turned Prime Minister who would lead the group dedicated to putting Okita Saburo’s vision into place.
Okita Saburo, the economist who, in 1945, articulated a vision for Japan revived as an economic power. Okita was the youngest of the men who would lead postwar Japan (he was born in 1914) and lived until 1993, just long enough to see his system begin to falter.
Okita Saburo, the economist who, in 1945, articulated a vision for Japan revived as an economic power. Okita was the youngest of the men who would lead postwar Japan (he was born in 1914) and lived until 1993, just long enough to see his system begin to falter.
Ikeda Hayato, the famously-abrasive bureaucrat and politician (PM 1960-1964). Ikeda is often credited with reaching out to the Japanese people and forging a consensus that the best way forward for the country was to focus all its resources on economic growth. His Income Doubling Plan was an ambitious (and ultimately successful) bid to massively stimulate the Japanese economy along the lines proposed by Okita Saburo and Yoshida Shigeru.
Ikeda Hayato, the famously-abrasive bureaucrat and politician (PM 1960-1964). Ikeda is often credited with reaching out to the Japanese people and forging a consensus that the best way forward for the country was to focus all its resources on economic growth. His Income Doubling Plan was an ambitious (and ultimately successful) bid to massively stimulate the Japanese economy along the lines proposed by Okita Saburo and Yoshida Shigeru.
Sato Eisaku, Prime Minister 1964-1972 (the longest-serving in Japanese history). Sato was the last of the Yoshida "honor students," and continued to carry forth his mentor's legacy.
Sato Eisaku, Prime Minister 1964-1972 (the longest-serving in Japanese history). Sato was the last of the Yoshida “honor students,” and continued to carry forth his mentor’s legacy.
Socialist and other left-wing protestors riot outside the Diet building in downtown Tokyo against the renewal of the US-Japan Mutual Security Treaty in 1960. The LDP faction in power had to bring in police and yakuza to prevent the crowds from halting the passage of the renewed treaty.
Socialist and other left-wing protestors riot outside the Diet building in downtown Tokyo against the renewal of the US-Japan Mutual Security Treaty in 1960. The LDP faction in power had to bring in police and yakuza to prevent the crowds from halting the passage of the renewed treaty.
Edwin Reischauer and his wife Matsukata Haru.
Edwin Reischauer and his wife Matsukata Haru.

Rising_sun_movie_poster_1993

The Mitsubishi F-2, the end result of the 15-odd year debacle that was the FSX fighter program.
The Mitsubishi F-2, the end result of the 15-odd year debacle that was the FSX fighter program.

Episode 67 – An Unnatural Intimacy, Part 5

This week, we take the final plunge to Pearl Harbor. Backed into a corner by foolish decision-making and serious misreadings of their situation, the leaders of Japan will scramble at the last minute to avoid war, but refuse to make any serious concessions to do so. In the end, war will happen not because anyone really wants it but because no one wants to avoid it badly enough.

Listen to the episode here.

Sources

Hotta, Eri. Japan 1941

Heinrichs, Waldo. Threshold of War

Iriye, Akira. The Origins of the Second World War in Asia and the Pacific

Images and Media

Admiral Toyoda Teijiro, Matsuoka Yosuke's replacement as foreign minister. Though less actively incompitent than his predecessor, he was not a skilled diplomat and did not have a plan to avert war.
Admiral Toyoda Teijiro, Matsuoka Yosuke’s replacement as foreign minister. Though less actively incompitent than his predecessor, he was not a skilled diplomat and did not have a plan to avert war.
German troops crossing the Soviet border in June, 1941. The invasion of the Soviet Union was a diplomatic disaster for Japan.
German troops crossing the Soviet border in June, 1941. The invasion of the Soviet Union was a diplomatic disaster for Japan.

OperationBarbarossa

Japanese troops entering Saigon in southern Indochina in July, 1941. The Japanese miscalculated, thinking that the United States would not put too much pressure on Japan as a result of the move.
Japanese troops entering Saigon in southern Indochina in July, 1941. The Japanese miscalculated, thinking that the United States would not put too much pressure on Japan as a result of the move.
Japanese bicycle troops riding into Saigon. Bicycles were a cheap, effective way of speeding up troops on the move in the 1940s.
Japanese bicycle troops riding into Saigon. Bicycles were a cheap, effective way of speeding up troops on the move in the 1940s.
Tojo Hideki at the time of his nomination as Prime Minister in October, 1941.
Tojo Hideki at the time of his nomination as Prime Minister in October, 1941.
Togo Shigenori, the liberal Foreign Minister appointed by Tojo in the hopes of averting war.
Togo Shigenori, the liberal Foreign Minister appointed by Tojo in the hopes of averting war.
Ambassador Nomura Kichisaburo (left) and Special Envoy Kurusu Saburo (right) after meeting with American Secretary of State Cordell Hull on November 27, 1941. Just 10 days later, Japan and the United States would be at war.
Ambassador Nomura Kichisaburo (left) and Special Envoy Kurusu Saburo (right) after meeting with American Secretary of State Cordell Hull on November 27, 1941. Just 10 days later, Japan and the United States would be at war.
Cordell Hull (center) with Ambassador Nomura (left) and Kurusu Saburo (right) on the way to the White House in November, 1941.
Cordell Hull (center) with Ambassador Nomura (left) and Kurusu Saburo (right) on the way to the White House in November, 1941.
The attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941. This photo was taken from an attacking Japanese warplane. The strike on Pearl Harbor was a tactical stroke of genius but utterly failed to accomplish its strategic goal of hitting the US hard enough to effectively knock it out of the Pacific.
The attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941. This photo was taken from an attacking Japanese warplane. The strike on Pearl Harbor was a tactical stroke of genius but utterly failed to accomplish its strategic goal of hitting the US hard enough to effectively knock it out of the Pacific.

Franklin Roosevelt declares war on Japan on December 8, 1941.