Episode 61 – Akutagawa Ryunosuke

This week, special guest reader Demetria Spinrad (whose own blog is available here, and makes for excellent reading) is on to read a script I’ve prepared about Akutagawa Ryunosuke, one of the foremost writers of modern Japan.

Though Demetria read the script, I still wrote it; any errors are still my own.

Listen to the episode here.

Sources

Keene, Donald. Dawn to the West: Japanese Literature in the Modern Era.

An excellent article on Akutagawa available from The Japan Times, as well as a biography by a professor at UC Berkeley.

 

The poster for Rashomon, the 1950 movie which catipulted both Kurosawa and Akutagawa to global fame.
The poster for Rashomon, the 1950 movie which catipulted both Kurosawa and Akutagawa to global fame.
Akutagawa, center, with several other friends from the First Higher School. Kikuchi Kan is the farthest on the left.
Akutagawa, center, with several other friends from the First Higher School. Kikuchi Kan is the farthest on the left.
Akutagawa Ryunosuke.
Akutagawa Ryunosuke.

Episode 59 – The Only Women in the Room

This week, we’re covering two women whose work in the Occupation helped reshape Japan into a modern state. Beate Sirota was the Austrian-born Jewish-American woman who pushed for Japan’s equal rights clauses in its Constitution, and Eleanor Hadley was a Seattle native who fought to disestablish Japan’s powerful zaibatsu.  We’ll discuss the lives and contributions of these two incredible women.

Listen to the episode here.

Sources

Dower, John. Embracing Defeat.

Hadley, Eleanor. Memoir of a Trustbuster.

Sirota-Gordon, Beate. The Only Woman in the Room.

An article on Hadley’s life from the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. 

Images