Episode 46 – The Emperor’s Own, Part 2

Sorry for the unscheduled delay, folks! Episode 46 is now live. Join us this week for a tale of Japan’s rise to military greatness, as Yamagata Aritomo situates the army and navy during the 1880s for their rise to power and prominence. Under his leadership, Japan will defeat China, the unchallenged master of Asia for millennia. However, a new threat is looming on the horizon: the colossal Russian Empire.

Listen to the episode here.

Sources

Drea, Edward. Japan’s Imperial Army: Its Rise and Fall, 1853-1945

Jansen, Marius. The Making of Modern Japan.

Presseisen, Ernst. Before Aggression: Europeans Prepare the Japanese Army.

Images (Courtesy of the Wikimedia Foundation)

Jakob Meckel, the ill-tempered Prussian officer sent to train the Imperial Army. His three year tenure would make him one of the most influential figures in the IJA's history.
Jakob Meckel, the ill-tempered Prussian officer sent to train the Imperial Army. His three year tenure would make him one of the most influential figures in the IJA’s history.
Japanese infantry in a Napoleonic-style firing line during the Sino-Japanese War. Meckel's teachings emphasized orthodox, Napoleonic tactics of which the above is a good example.
Japanese infantry in a Napoleonic-style firing line during the Sino-Japanese War. Meckel’s teachings emphasized orthodox, Napoleonic tactics of which the above is a good example.
The Battle of the Yalu River; during this engagement, the Japanese destroyed the Beiyang Fleet, Qing China's most advanced naval force. From this point on Japan ruled the seas in East Asia.
The Battle of the Yalu River; during this engagement, the Japanese destroyed the Beiyang Fleet, Qing China’s most advanced naval force. From this point on Japan ruled the seas in East Asia.
Chinese captives during the First Sino-Japanese War. The troops holding them prisoner are ethnic Koreans serving in the Imperial Army.
Chinese captives during the First Sino-Japanese War. The troops holding them prisoner are ethnic Koreans serving in the Imperial Army.
Chinese leaders, led by Admiral Ding Rucheng, surrendering to Japanese forces after the battle of Weihaiwei.
Chinese leaders, led by Admiral Ding Rucheng, surrendering to Japanese forces after the battle of Weihaiwei.
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2 thoughts on “Episode 46 – The Emperor’s Own, Part 2

  1. David

    Really enjoy the podcast! thanks for spending the time to create it each week.

    As a future topic selection – I would be interested in something on the role of outsiders in Japan (both historically and currently) – thinking here of the large Korean population and growing Chinese population. I assume the Western population has always been pretty small in the big scheme of things.

    PS – the economist has a large section this week on the role of women in Japanese business this week which might be of interest. You can get it from their podcast feed (or the print edition).

    1. Thanks so much! That means a lot.

      I definitely want to put something together on the Zainichi (resident) Koreans and Chinese; I’m just debating whether I want to do it as a separate show or fold it into some planned multi-parters on the Japan-Korea and Japan-China relationships.

      I’ll take a look at that stuff from the Economist! I know women in the workforce is a huge issue in Japan right now (and perhaps ripe for a show of its own!)

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