Episode 40 – Japan’s Christian Century, Part 3

This week, we’ll discuss the arrival of William Adams, the reversal of fortune for Spain and Catholicism in Asia, and the suppression of Christianity by the Tokugawa.  We’re also going to discuss the legacy of Japan’s Christian century, and how it relates to our conception of history.

Listen to the episode here.

Sources

Boxer, C.R. The Christian Century in Japan.

Sansom, George. A History of Japan, Vol II (1334-1614)/ Vol III (1614-1867)

Images (Courtesy of the Wikimedia Foundation)

The Liefde, the ship William Adams sailed to Japan.
The Liefde, the ship William Adams sailed to Japan.
Letter from King James I to Tokugawa Ieyasu, dated 1616 (received by Tokugawa Hidetada).
Letter from King James I to Tokugawa Ieyasu, dated 1616 (received by Tokugawa Hidetada).
A trading pass written in Japanese authorizing trade by Dutch ships, dating from 1609.
A trading pass written in Japanese authorizing trade by Dutch ships, dating from 1609.
A Japanese trading ship (referred to as a Red Seal Ship -- note the red seal on the trading pass above).
A Japanese trading ship (referred to as a Red Seal Ship — note the red seal on the trading pass above).
The Dutch East India Company trade post in Hirado, near Nagasaki.
The Dutch East India Company trade post in Hirado, near Nagasaki.
The grave of William Adams.
The grave of William Adams.
Takayama Ukon, the daimyo who gave up his land and prosperity to avoid giving up his faith.
Takayama Ukon, the daimyo who gave up his land and prosperity to avoid giving up his faith.
The siege of Hara castle during the Shimabara Rebellion. Dutch ships are visible in the south.
The siege of Hara castle during the Shimabara Rebellion. Dutch ships are visible in the south.
Statues of the Buddhist bodhhisatva Jizo from the ruins of Hara Castle. The heads of each statue were removed by rebelling Christians during the Shimabara Rebellion.
Statues of the Buddhist bodhhisatva Jizo from the ruins of Hara Castle. The heads of each statue were removed by rebelling Christians during the Shimabara Rebellion.
The ruins of Hara Castle, site of the Shimabara Rebellion.
The ruins of Hara Castle, site of the Shimabara Rebellion.
Amakusa Tokisada, the leader of the Shimabara Rebellion.
Amakusa Tokisada, the leader of the Shimabara Rebellion.
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