Episode 26 – The History of Manga

This week, we’re going to talk about the evolution of manga. We’ll discuss the roots of the comic form in Japan, both Eastern and Western, and its rapid explosion in popularity after World War II.
Listen to the episode here.

Sources

Allen, Kate and John Ingulsrud. “Manga Literacy: Popular Culture and the Reading Habits of Japanese College Students.” Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy 46, no 8 (May 2003, pp. 674-683.

Kinsella, Sharon. Adult Manga: Culture and Power in Contemporary Japanese Society. Honolulu; University of Hawai’i Press, 2000.

Schodt, Frederik L. Manga! Manga! The World of Japanese Comics. Tokyo: Kodansha, 2013.

Toku, Masami. “Shojo Manga! Girls’ Comics! A Mirror of Girls’ Dreams.” Mechademia 2, Networks of Desire (2007), pp. 18-32.

Images

The Shigisan Engi. Courtesy of the Wikimedia Foundation.
The Shigisan Engi. Courtesy of the Wikimedia Foundation.
A scene from the Choju Jinbutsu Giga depicting animals wrestling. Courtesy of the Wikimedia Foundation.
A scene from the Choju Jinbutsu Giga depicting animals wrestling. Courtesy of the Wikimedia Foundation.
An Edo Period kibyoshi. Courtesy of the National Diet Library of Japan.
An Edo Period kibyoshi. Courtesy of the National Diet Library of Japan.
A Meiji Period political cartoon showing a great deal of Western influence. The cartoon is making fun of a power struggle in the Meiji government between Okuma Shigenobu (the bear) and Okubo Toshimichi (the octopus). Courtesy of Waseda University.
A Meiji Period political cartoon showing a great deal of Western influence. The cartoon is making fun of a power struggle in the Meiji government between Okuma Shigenobu (the bear) and Okubo Toshimichi (the octopus). Courtesy of Waseda University.
The Japanese cover of Vol 8 of Tetsuwan Atomu (Astro Boy) by Tezuka Osamu. Courtesy of the Wikimedia Foundation.
The Japanese cover of Vol 8 of Tetsuwan Atomu (Astro Boy) by Tezuka Osamu. Courtesy of the Wikimedia Foundation.
The birth of a legend; issue one of Mazinger Z, the first ever giant robot manga. Courtesy of the Wikimedia Foundation.
The birth of a legend; issue one of Mazinger Z, the first ever giant robot manga. Courtesy of the Wikimedia Foundation.
The main characters of Ikeda Riyoko's Berusaya no Bara (The Rose of Versailles). On the left is Marie Antoinette, on the right is the protagonist Oscar. Courtesy of the Wikimedia Foundation.
The main characters of Ikeda Riyoko’s Berusaya no Bara (The Rose of Versailles). On the left is Marie Antoinette, on the right is the protagonist Oscar. Courtesy of the Wikimedia Foundation.
A cover of the English translation of Kozure Okami (Lone Wolf and Cub), featuring the protagonist Ogami Itto. Courtesy of Dark Horse Publishing.
A cover of the English translation of Kozure Okami (Lone Wolf and Cub), featuring the protagonist Ogami Itto. Courtesy of Dark Horse Publishing.
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